Entrepenuership


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Entrepenuership


Use the following Cross­-curricular topics and relevant organizing concepts to help you select concepts you would like your students

to learn about, research and take action on during the unit. Use technology, inquiry methods, and nonfiction resources to rigorously

explore or extend your unit focusing on STEM college and career readiness, math concepts, human impacts on scarcity issues, the

water/energy nexus, the interdependence of science, engineering and technology, resource consumption cause and effects, and

geography’s social impact.

Printable copy
 

Entrepreneurship / Art:

Idea: Market and sell efficiency products and services that students produce.

● Example: Decorated rain barrels, efficiency audits, then track the businesses’ utility consumption to demonstrate the savings created by the efficiency technology or behavior change.

➨ Case Study: Project Rainway, students decorate and sell rain barrels

● Example: Have students offer to conduct basic energy or water audits in their community.

Math- Functions/ Ratios


Math- Functions/ Ratios


Math: Functions / Statistics:

● Pre­Algebra

○ Units and measurement

○ Determining best type of graph / table based on the data and research question

○ Averages

○ Plotting data / X­Y coordinates

○ Identifying trends

○ Plotting a fitted line

○ Rates vs. ratio

Handout/activity: Water’s Carbon Footprint by state

Handout/activity: Water’s Carbon Footprint by state

● Algebra 1

○ Linear vs nonlinear functions

○ Linear growth and decline

○ Exponential growth and decline

○ Derive the equation of a line (slope)

○ Projections: Average kWh per day → projected consumption per year

○ Conversions:

■ eg. Hundreds of Cubic Feet per/ quarter → Cost $ per day

■ eg. Volume of water used to volume equivalent, such as elephants or school busses

■ eg. Kilowatt/hours or gallons of water to carbon footprint

 

 

● Advanced Algebra

○ Modeling functions

○ Polynomial functions

○ Relationships between variables: Accurately defining the quantitative effect of an independent variable ­­inverse, correlation, causation.

■ E.g. Natural gas usage vs. temperature; water use vs. price

○ Missing variable equations:

■ Example: “13 days into the month 12,000 gallons have been used, if there are 17 days left and you want to use under 30000 gallons what will your average usage per day need to be?”

■ Example: Establish the relationship between outdoor temperature and electricity usage (if heating is electric). Predict next week’s electricity consumption given the forecast.

● Capstone performance tasks / “Big Open-­ended Problem” (BOP)

Use utility consumption data as the basis for having students take a position on a story problem and defend it using an analysis of the data.

■ Example: Track and plot utility usage, then determine line of best fit. Explain the trend in written form incorporating data and qualitative evidence such as a log of home water use

■ Example B.O.P. inspired by STEMhero

Human-impacts


Human-impacts


Human Impacts / Civics / Ethics

Watershed health and water quality: tips and non-fiction sources (curated for students)

Watershed health and water quality: tips and non-fiction sources (curated for students)

Water-Energy Nexus tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students) 

Water-Energy Nexus tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students) 

Energy Efficiency: tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students)

Energy Efficiency: tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students)

Water efficiency: tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students)    

Water efficiency: tips and supplemental non-fiction sources (curated for students)    

Civics / Ethics: Resources and potential guiding questions

Topic 1) Pricing: How should leaders develop utility pricing and programs that ensure the water or energy system remains safe and reliable, but also doesn't unfairly burden the poor?  

 

Topic 2) Sustainable resource management: What responsibility, if any, do users of water and energy have to do their best to use those resources as efficiently as possible? What tradeoffs, timeframes, and perspectives should be considered and balanced as choices are made to take or not take actions to become more efficient users of water and energy? What are other examples of challenges in our community which can be made better or worse based on the relatively small actions of many people? Sometimes these types of challenges are know as "Collective Action Problems". 

Health STEMheroes


Health STEMheroes


Health heroes*

*Currently being piloted


Self reported student data is de-identified and aggregated so that resources can be leveraged in areas where need is greatest.

Self reported student data is de-identified and aggregated so that resources can be leveraged in areas where need is greatest.

Do you have ideas for Health Heroes, or want to perhaps become a pilot teacher of the new program? Let us know and we can get you more information:

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